Sustainable Materials without the hot air
Making buildings, vehicles and products efficiently and with less new material

By (author) Julian AllwoodBy (author) Jonathan Cullen


Quote from review of previous edition: A review quote taken from a review of a previous edition of the work

“Instead of the usual ya-boo about sustainability, this is a pragmatic guide to getting more value from less stuff. Researched with long-term co-operation from industry, it emphasizes facts and evidence but is aimed at a popular readership.”


Quote from review of previous edition: A review quote taken from a review of a previous edition of the work

“A valuable, impartial expert source in an important debate."


Biographical note (a single note referring to all contributors to a product – see PR.8.17 for a biography which is linked to a single contributor)

Julian Allwood is a Professor of Engineering at the University of Cambridge, where
he leads the Low Carbon Materials Processing research group. Jonathan Cullen is
University Lecturer in the University of Cambridge Engineering Department. They
both have extensive practical experience working in the engineering industry, as well as
taking part in numerous research projects.


Quote from review of previous edition: A review quote taken from a review of a previous edition of the work

"I found this book to be well researched with reasoned and compelling arguments. Allwood and Cullen are to be congratulated on delivering a methodology that can be regarded as a paradigm shift to a new way of teaching and understanding materials science in the post-fossil fuel era society is now entering. This is essential reading for both student and practitioner, particularly those in senior management positions. 10/10."


Quote from review of previous edition: A review quote taken from a review of a previous edition of the work

"The book offers perspectives from fundamental materials science, process engineering, product design and architecture, and economics not seen in most materials texts. With all the attention given to nanomaterials, it is easy to forget that far more is built with steel and aluminum.They consider ways to reduce their use, better recycle them, or replace them entirely—and whether such changes might become widely implemented."


Previous review quote: a quote from a review of a previous work by the same author(s) or in the same series

"Sustainable Materials (like Sustainable Energy) is a popular engineering text, a rare and wonderful kind of book. Allwood and Cullen write about engineering with the elegance of the best pop-science writers -- say, James Gleick or Rebecca Skloot -- but while science is never far from their work, their focus is on engineering. They render lucid and comprehensible the processes and calculations needed to make things and improve things, touching on chemistry, physics, materials science, economics and logistics without slowing down or losing the reader. a valuable, impartial expert source in an important debate."


Previous review quote: a quote from a review of a previous work by the same author(s) or in the same series

"accessible, fact-filled and entertaining read."


Previous review quote: a quote from a review of a previous work by the same author(s) or in the same series

"This is something you don’t see every day: a substantial, carefully-researched book on how to reform our manufacturing industries for policy-makers trying to cut emissions, and anyone in manufacturing, it should be required reading."


Web Description

UIT - Resources - Sustainable Materials - 1st ed cover 173x200

This is the second edition.  The first edition was published under the title Sustainable Materials - with both eyes open.  It was chosen as an Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association/ACRL's Choice magazine.  The new edition is updated and contains an extra chapter.

Materials, transformed from natural resources into the buildings, equipment, vehicles and goods that underpin our remarkable lifestyle, are made with amazing efficiency. But our growing demand is not sustainable. This optimistic and richly-informed book evaluates all the options and explains how we can greatly reduce the amount of material demanded and used in manufacturing, while still meeting everyone's needs.

"Instead of the usual ya-boo about sustainability, this is a pragmatic guide to getting more value from less stuff. Researched with long-term co-operation from industry, it emphasizes facts and evidence but is aimed at a popular readership." - BBC News Magazine

"A valuable, impartial expert source in an important debate." - Boing Boing